News

‘Gluten-free’ labeling standards kick in

‘Gluten-free’ labeling standards kick in

GLUTEN FREE: Starting this week, "gluten free" labels on packaged foods have real meaning. Until now, the term "gluten free" had not been regulated, and manufacturers made their own decisions about what it means. Photo: Associated Press/Jon Elswick

MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Starting this week, “gluten-free” labels on packaged foods have real meaning.

Until now, the term “gluten-free” had not been regulated, and manufacturers made their own decisions about what it means.

This new requirement is especially important for people who suffer from celiac disease and don’t absorb nutrients well. They can get sick from the gluten found in wheat and other cereal grains.

Food manufacturers faced a Tuesday deadline to ensure that anything labeled gluten-free contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten — ensuring that those products are technically free of wheat, rye and barley.

That amount is generally recognized by the medical community to be low enough so that most people who have celiac disease won’t get sick if they eat it.

Latest Headlines

in Local

Maine Senate Confirms Public Utilities Commission Nominee

WGAN-100x100

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) _ The Maine Senate has confirmed Republican Gov. Paul LePage’s pick for the Public Utilities Commission. The…

in Local

Environmental advocates Push Solar, Energy Efficiency Bills

WGAN-100x100

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) _ A group of environmental advocates are urging lawmakers to support measures aimed at expanding solar power…

in Local

More Than 2,100 Without Power in Northern Maine

WGAN-100x100

MILO, Maine (AP) _ More than 2,100 customers are without power in northern Penobscot and Piscataquis counties as utility crews…

in Local

Yellow Zone Parking Ban in Portland

WGAN

Yellow Zone Parking Ban in Portland tonight starting at 10PM.

in Local

Maine Audubon Seeks Return Of Stuffed Hare, Turtle

GENERIC INVESTIGATE

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) - In what sounds like a cruel twist on an ancient fable, Maine Audubon is seeking the return of a stuffed hare and turtle that it uses for educational purposes.