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National Zoo panda cub growing, healthy

National Zoo panda cub growing, healthy

In this photo provided by the Smithsonian's National Zoo, a member of the panda team at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo performs the first neonatal exam Sunday, Aug. 25, 2013, on a giant panda cub born Friday, Aug. 23, in Washington. Photo: Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Zoo’s giant panda cub has been given a clean bill of health after its first veterinary exam.

Veterinarians performed a 20-minute examination Monday after panda mother Mei Xiang gave them an opportunity. She put the female cub down and left the den for a short time to eat bamboo and drink water.

The cub, born Aug. 23, is already showing her coloration with black patches around her ears, eyes and back.

Curator Brandie Smith says it’s amazing to see how much the cub has grown in less than a month. It now weighs slightly less than two pounds, more than double her weight from a short exam on Aug. 25.

From nose to tail, the cub is 10.6 inches long. Her eyes have not yet opened.

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