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Peace out: Lakers waive Metta World Peace

Peace out: Lakers waive Metta World Peace

Los Angeles Lakers forward Metta World Peace talks to the media at their practice center in El Segundo, Calif., Monday, April 29, 2013. The Lakes lost in the first round of the playoffs to the San Antonio Spurs. Photo: Associated Press/Chris Carlson

EL SEGUNDO, Calif. (AP) — It’s Peace out for the Los Angeles Lakers.

They waived Metta World Peace on Thursday under the NBA’s amnesty provision.

He averaged 12.4 points and 5.0 rebounds in 75 games last season, having joined the Lakers in 2009.

The former Ron Artest legally changed his name during his tenure with the team. One of the highlights of his time with the Lakers was his clutch play in Game 7 of the 2010 NBA Finals, which helped them beat Boston for the franchise’s 16th championship.

A 14-year veteran, World Peace has also played for Houston, Sacramento, Indiana and Chicago during his career.

He won the league’s citizenship award in 2011 for his off-court contributions.

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